thefrogman

nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.

When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”

Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years.

CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts

richardlinklaters

coolchicksfromhistory:

For over 40 years, Vivian Maier worked as a nanny and spent her free time as a street photographer.  Intensely private, she never showed her work to anyone, but left a legacy of over 100,000 negatives.  These negatives were discovered by a local historian at an auction house in 2007 and since then her prints have been exhibited at museums from Los Angeles to Oslo.  Lanny Silverman, a curator at the Chicago Cultural Centre, believes that  “the best of [Vivian’s] work ranks up there with anybody. She covers humanist portraiture and street life, she covers children, she covers abstraction and she does them all with a style that I think digests the history of photography.”

Above are some examples of Vivian’s work.  The photo at the top left is a self portrait taken in 1953.  Vivian Maier: Street Photographer, the first book of her photography was published in 2011.

humansofnewyork
humansofnewyork:

“Those are my parents. They’ve been married 55 years. They met when my dad was visiting Mexico as a young man. He saw my mom at a party, but he couldn’t speak a word of Spanish, so they just sort of looked at each other and giggled. Everything was very formal back then, so he asked a mutual friend to obtain permission for him to contact her. My mom gave my dad her address, and when he went back to America, he would write her a letter every few days. He’d write the entire letter in English, and then get a Spanish dictionary and translate it word by word. My mom says the letters barely made sense. But after he’d written many letters, he went back to Mexico and they went on their first date. There were adult chaperones and everything, they didn’t even kiss or touch. It was all very formal. And after a few dates, they decided to marry. Her family thought she was crazy to marry this weird American who kept writing the letters. But she said she knew he was the one. Get this—- just two years ago, we were all visiting Italy. And I busted the two of them making out in a corner. I snapped a photo. Dad’s got Mom pinned up against a wall and he’s macking her hard.”

humansofnewyork:

“Those are my parents. They’ve been married 55 years. They met when my dad was visiting Mexico as a young man. He saw my mom at a party, but he couldn’t speak a word of Spanish, so they just sort of looked at each other and giggled. Everything was very formal back then, so he asked a mutual friend to obtain permission for him to contact her. My mom gave my dad her address, and when he went back to America, he would write her a letter every few days. He’d write the entire letter in English, and then get a Spanish dictionary and translate it word by word. My mom says the letters barely made sense. But after he’d written many letters, he went back to Mexico and they went on their first date. There were adult chaperones and everything, they didn’t even kiss or touch. It was all very formal. And after a few dates, they decided to marry. Her family thought she was crazy to marry this weird American who kept writing the letters. But she said she knew he was the one. Get this—- just two years ago, we were all visiting Italy. And I busted the two of them making out in a corner. I snapped a photo. Dad’s got Mom pinned up against a wall and he’s macking her hard.”